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Sales experience

Hullo there, I am a newcomer to sales and fairly excited about it too. Would anybody like to share a good sales experience here (succesful or not doesn't matter)?

Smile
  • Former Member
    Former Member
    1. Get out onto the field.
    2. Qualify qualify qualify (Exact Requirement, Time Frame for Decision, and Budget)
    3. Constantly show value to your customer.
    4. Learn closing skills, dont be an ostrich, keep your manager involved.
    5. Remember Sales means 'You've got to sell, no excuses, and you've got to bill at the end of the month'.
  • 1. Keep yourselves goal oriented.
    2. Qualify
    3. Present yourself as the best.
    4. Do let me know your experiences.

    quote:
    Originally posted by stephanie

    Hullo there, I am a newcomer to sales and fairly excited about it too. Would anybody like to share a good sales experience here (succesful or not doesn't matter)?

    Smile

  • After more than 18 years in bussines:

    *Do not lie. Not too much, that is.

    *Do never talk down on [competetive] products that you do not know anything about.

    *Mind that the customer in the future is going to purhase more; and make sure that he is going to talk to you first.
  • Thanks for your reply friends.I haven't closed any order as yet. But I move as follows.

    1) Doing a SWOT on myself and my product first.
    2) Building trust and relationship with client as An has written.
    3) Understanding the clients requirements.
    4) Showing a suitable demo.
    5) Closing the deal (hasen't happened as yet).


    The part where I need help is ...... at all stages :). But the score is low here 3:181.

    Thanks.
  • Thanks Nitesh, any tips on 'Qualifying'? What about strategies? Concept selling is imporatant in India. Most customers don't know the advantages of an ERP, of course, a simple demo clarifies matters. But the last client I had told me ERP is too complicated, his team is scared he prefers a simple software for tracking of Inventory. Plus Navision is expensive for the Indian customer(the bottom line seems to be this) Smile.

    quote:
    Originally posted by Nitesh

    1. Keep yourselves goal oriented.
    2. Qualify
    3. Present yourself as the best.
    4. Do let me know your experiences.

    quote:
    Originally posted by stephanie

    Hullo there, I am a newcomer to sales and fairly excited about it too. Would anybody like to share a good sales experience here (succesful or not doesn't matter)?

    Smile



  • Hate to sound negative - but I think one of the best qualities of a salesperson is knowing when to walk away from a sale - even an easy one.

    If the product (or your company's skills/speciallity) doesn't fit, the profit of license revenue and implementation will quickly be wiped out by non-revenue support issues, fixes, complaints, dissatisfaction, a bad reference site, etc. etc. (not to mention the stress on your implementation team!)

    Better to discount the product and implementation to a customer that you can see will be good moving forward (good reference, low maintenance support contract, training, extra user licenses, consultancy....), than to see $$$ signs up front with a prospect that will ultimately cost your company money.
  • Hi,

    I would just like to second Adam's comments and add that you should never, ever agree to "build the old system" in Navision.

    I have come accross a number of occasions in the past where instead of learning the Navision way, the customer just wants their old system with a Navision interface and the salesperson has agreed to this. I have never come accross a site where this has happened, that has not been a big problem. Selling a Navision system or a Navision system with tailoring is OK, but replicating an old system in Navision will always disappoint the customer. The customer does not want Navision, they want their old system with all its faults fixed.

    If a customer cannot learn how to use the software or adapt their business structures even slightly, then they are dinosaurs that will probably go out of buisness anyway because they are inflexable and cannot adapt or innovate [}:)]

    Such sites will always be more bother than they are worth.
  • We are selling and implementing Navision in Colombia and I guess we are facing a bit the same issues regarding ERP benefits and costs as you in India..... I can give you some hints that have helped us a lot.

    1) be honest - listen to your prospect and tell them honestly what you can do, how you will be doing it, and mention what you won't recommend with the appropriate arguments.

    2) benefits of ERP and Navision:
    - integration
    - single information base
    - efficiency gains
    - customization - you do not deliver an accounting black box but a personalized, high end, opened software solution
    - keeps growing as the prospects business grows...
    - get away from manual work - automate it to be faster than the competitors

    3) regarding costs - the following arguments helped us a lot:
    - we do not sell software, but solutions to customer problems
    - do not copmare us for price, we are not the "cheapest" ones, but the best ones to solve your problems -> quality approach
    - show the prospect the future posibilities, international experience of Navision and the possible backup of more than 2200 partner companies worldwide
    - in the short run, it is a considerable investment, on the long run it will turn out cheaper than buying and implementing an accounting package every 2 years and doing lots of stuff manually
    - we don't negotiate on prices, if prospect want discounts, we negotiate over consultancy days or functionality - the prospect must understand that this work and the solution has its price

    4) As Adam points out, do not close every possible deal. Some contracts might be highly dangerous for the NSC in terms of workload, bad reference, up to legal problems with the customer. It's a very important point, and it hurts a lot when You have to say "No" to in interested prospect. Be tough and don't sell under price, once starting with this strategy everybody will ask for a discount and a special price.

    5) Check out the "payment habits" of the prospect - a prospect who won't be able to pay a Navision implementation or has very bad payment habits, isn't really a pleasure to work for.

    Good luck and hope you close a deal soon Wink
    Nils
  • stephanie,
    I would like to add somethin here.Our products are different in a way compared to other ones which are well known in India.Different because they are desugned to cater to a different segment.Sales would be much more difficult because u don't hv knowledgeble people to understand what u want them to.Because level of people in SME industry is not the one u would find in large companies(IT staff there are aware of erp markets.the questions posed by SME customers are totally differnt. For example, u will find it most difficult to explain them why they need an ERP.Why they are supposed to spend so much & what exactly they r going to get after spending so much.
    I'm sure u would find this mindset in 80% of yr. customers. In my opinion, gather info which might seem irrelevant to you for each case & than decide yr. stratagy accordingly.
    Info like: How much IT exposure they hv.How thier business has developed.Why they gave u a chance to sell.What is their pshycology of business.
    This will definitely help u in deciding your approach.

    Dharmendra Desai
    quote:
    Originally posted by stephanie

    Thanks Nitesh, any tips on 'Qualifying'? What about strategies? Concept selling is imporatant in India. Most customers don't know the advantages of an ERP, of course, a simple demo clarifies matters. But the last client I had told me ERP is too complicated, his team is scared he prefers a simple software for tracking of Inventory. Plus Navision is expensive for the Indian customer(the bottom line seems to be this) Smile.

    quote:
    Originally posted by Nitesh

    1. Keep yourselves goal oriented.
    2. Qualify
    3. Present yourself as the best.
    4. Do let me know your experiences.

    quote:
    Originally posted by stephanie

    Hullo there, I am a newcomer to sales and fairly excited about it too. Would anybody like to share a good sales experience here (succesful or not doesn't matter)?

    Smile





  • Do we have a standard questionnaire which can help us organise ourselves better ? Of course selling is an art and a skill too we need to guide ourselves by intution, probing and inquiring.... keep trying till you get fired Big Smile or u get a sale [8D].

    Regarding replacing old systems with new system, its fine till we talk about manufacturing or marketing. But in India finance is about tons of records and returns(Excise duty, sales tax TDS etc). How to attack that? Since Navision is actually financials we have a slight advantage here if it appeals to the CFO of the company we have won half the battle.



    [quote]Originally posted by dharmendra

    stephanie,
  • Hi All,

    For Selling a product first of all you must know your target market for which you should have good knowledge of the product ( Navision ).
    like Navision Capacity to handle No. of Users ?
    Is Navision Par with Other ERPs
    How is it better than other ERPs
    You have to convince the client that Navision is better than most of the ERPs available and for that you must have proper product knowledge.
    Hope this will help you
    cheers
  • quote:
    Originally posted by Bobbysrivastava


    ... and for that you must have proper product knowledge.




    Yeah, and that is still the biggest problem within the Solution Centers. Sales persons who have only read the whitepapers, "developers" who are not able to make a correct function call and don't not care about gui guides and implementer who do not know what a "Gen. Bus. Posting Grp." is!
    Cheers
    Walter
  • In every posting I read about the advantages of Navision. The most important thing however is that you can convince the prospect that you sell solutions and not a product, and that you understand his business.
    Therefore, chosing a proposition and a (couple of) particular market segments with following referentstories are of much more importance than the product the problems of the customer are solved with. If you van show the customer some specific items relevant for his business it will be easy closing the deal!

    Good luck,
  • Former Member
    Former Member
    Hi,
    Everybody - I am in the Indian ERP Market for last 2 1/2 years.These are some of the tips :
    1) Networking with people is the key to any high involvement product.
    2)Know your product vis a vis your competitors.
    If you are India you have three segments to fight with :
    a) Premium Segment products like SAP , JDE , PEOPLESOFT etc. Lot of selling against material for these players will be available with the NSC Delhi.Cost of the product , Lesser total cost of ownership, focus on SME right from the design , flexibility of customisation , shorter implementation cycles are your plus points here.

    Next is the Medium Segment with home grown ERP Products . Remember it is very difficult to beat these products on cost factor.You should harp on quality , brand name , reliability , long term standing , lesser loss of learning as it is a MS Product now and can be scaled.Also tell the customer by going for navision he has choice to choose / change the vendor ( read NSC ).

    Further below if only modular sales is expected the there are a lot of low cost products available both branded as well as unbranded.While selling against these customers it is very difficult ( read impossible ) to convince on the cost factor.The best thing is qualify the customers properly and try and avoid doing a bad sell.
    3)Never get into the trap of starting customisation before getting the cheque.

    In case you have a specific problem contact me on
    prashantlingayat@indiatimes.com
  • We have a client who is a manufacturing outfit. They have a model wherein they outsource 90% of their manufacturing process ( i.e finished products ), the spares are normally given by the client to their outsourcing vendors. The client out of their line of 20 products, manufactures only 1 product inhouse. Will navision attain be a good choice as an erp to handle their business process for Purchase, Sales, Store, Mfg, Warehousing and Accounts/finance. My understanding is that the subcontracting section of MS Nav. Attain is not a very explicit module. Please throw some light on the same, as the client doesn't have very high budgets for their Buss. Solution.
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